5 Most Infamous Hotel Ghosts

infamous hotel guests

October is the month for all things spooky. And what’s more quintessentially creepy than a haunted hotel? Whether you’re planning a meeting or an event for next year’s scary season, or just looking for a place where your attendees will enjoy some thrills, kick things up a notch at these haunted hotels. Added bonus—these aren’t just any ole hauntings. These ghosts have earned some serious notoriety either during their lifetime or postmortem.

1. Kate Morgan, Hotel del Coronado (San Diego)

Hotel del Coronado is known for its extensive history, which dates back to the 1800s. Specifically, Kate Morgan has been haunting the hotel since she passed in 1892. At this time, she was waiting for her husband and partner in crime (both were traveling con artists). He never arrived, and four days later, the pregnant Morgan was found at the bottom of the outdoor staircase with a self-inflicted blow to the head. Since then, there has been an abundance of paranormal reports. Guests have reported seeing the ghost of Morgan wandering the property. The most “active” area is Room 3327 (formerly Room 3312).

2. Freelan Oscar and Flora Stanley, The Stanley Hotel (Estes Park, Colorado)

It would only make sense to include the hotel that inspired Stephen King’s The Shining on the list. Freelan Oscar Stanley was an inventor, hotelier and businessman. Although he invented several things throughout his lifetime, such as photographic plates, he is most famous for co-founding Stanley Motor Carriage Company and The Stanley Hotel with his twin brother, Francis Edgar Stanley. Paranormal activity began in the 1970s—leading to numerous investigations. Reports are mainly about the ghosts of Freelan and his wife, Flora. These generally take place in the Billiards Room or in the Music Room—where, apparently, the piano inexplicably plays. After staying in room 217 in 1974, King wrote his horror novel.

3. Marian Hooper Adams, The Hay-Adams (Washington, D.C.)

The Hay-Adams is an upscale hotel that has hosted many politicians. Before the famous hotel was built, John Hay (Abraham Lincoln’s private secretary and later a secretary of state) and his best friend, Henry Adams (author and descendant of John Quincy Adams) built their home on that plot in 1884. Marian Hooper Adams, Adams’ wife, has committed suicide on this land in 1885, and in 1927, the houses were demolished and replaced by the hotel. Guests claim to experience her ghost haunting the hotel. These accounts involve sounds of a woman softly crying, along with other mysterious voices.

4. John Belushi, Chateau Marmont (Hollywood, California)

The Saturday Night Live star was known for partying quite frequently at Chateau Marmont. Many speculate that perhaps this is why he refuses to leave, even in the afterlife. Bungalow 3 is the site where he overdosed in 1982. Since his death, many have encountered oddities in the area. Perhaps most significantly, a toddler appeared to be interacting with a ghost who he called “the funny man,” while his family was staying at the hotel. It gets more bizarre—when browsing through pictures of celebrity guests, the toddler pointed to Belushi and exclaimed, “That’s the funny man!”

5. Thomas “Fatty” Walsh, The Biltmore Miami-Coral Gables

This hotel has seen several changes throughout its long history. In the 1920s, it hosted wealthy socialites, celebrities and even gangsters. The hotel was shut down during the 1940s, in order for it to be used as a hospital for war soldiers. In the 1970s, it was unrecognizable—completely abandoned and decrepit. Now, the Biltmore is a top luxury hotel, restored back to its former glory.  Remnants of its past remain, though—specifically the ghost of one notorious mobster. In 1929, Thomas “Fatty” Walsh was murdered over a gambling debt in the hotel. Many of those who have stayed and worked at The Biltmore  Miami-Coral Gables report ghostly incidents in the elevator, such as doors opening and closing, and flickering lights. This is especially true on the 13th floor—where Walsh was killed.