T-Mobile Arena Cleans Up in Vegas with LEED Gold Status

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T-Mobile Arena on the Las Vegas Strip has gone green in a big way, earning LEED Gold certification for its sustainability practices.

That marks a first for a Las Vegas sports facility. But it’s not alone. The 20,000-seats sports and entertainment venue joins about 30 other sports palaces in America in achieving LEED certification from the U.S. Green Building Council.

T-Mobile Arena goes big and small on meetings

T-Mobile Arena celebrates its first anniversary on April 6. Anschutz Entertainment Group and MGM Resorts International developed the $375 million venue in a 50-50 partnership. The arena will be home to the Las Vegas Golden Knights, an NHL expansion team. The venue plans to host about 100 events a year. Since its opening, arena-packing acts have included the Rolling Stones, U2, Cold Play and George Strait.

T-Mobile Arena also has smaller meetings in mind. It features 50 luxury suites, more than two dozen private loge boxes and other hospitality offerings.
Event suites include 12 to 16 tickets. Party suites include 40 tickets and up to 60 standing-room-only tickets. For smaller groups, sports terrace tables include four tickets. Prices depend on the event.

Does green building affect cell phone reception?

Since U.S. wireless companies are locked in an intense battle for customers, it’s worth noting that AT&T Park, home of MLB’s San Francisco Giants, has LEED Silver certification, a notch below T-Mobile Arena. And Verizon Center in Washington, D.C., home of NBA’s Washington Wizards and NHL’s Washington Capitals—has no certification at all.

Getting more than bragging rights

The U.S. Green Building Council notes that sport facilities with LEED status, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, have benefits beyond bragging rights. Energy-efficient buildings are cheaper to operate, for instance. And green buildings give audiences exposure to sustainable practices and help build support.

The U.S. Green Building Council rates buildings on such things as  energy efficiency, water conservation, and waste and recycling practices.